A Provision for Love

My newest story is part of a series, entitled ENTANGLED INHERITANCE. The series will include four stand-alone regency romances, all written by talented authors, authors I am fortunate to call friends. Really, writing is often a solitary journey… but then you meet other authors and editors and I want to jump for joy. Sally Britton, Ashtyn Newbold, and Rebecca Connolly are all incredibly kind, talented, and FUN!

Remember that photoshoot I mentioned on instagram? Well, I could not be more pleased with the results (along with Amanda’s AWESOMENESS!). Look at this beautiful cover:

The only place Ivy Linfield feels truly uninhibited is within the walls and gardens of Bridgestone. There, she is free of society’s expectations and her worries of the future. With the death of Lord Percival Barrington, the only grandfather figure she’s ever known, Ivy is torn between the grief of losing him and her beloved summer home. 

Losing Bridgestone, even to one as worthy and handsome as Percival’s great-nephew Henry, seems cruel and unfair. So when Ivy learns of a provision in the will, she is more than willing to go to great lengths to secure the inheritance for herself. The only catch? Ivy must marry a man that fits a list of requirements before the season ends. 

She quickly learns, however, that love has its own set of rules–rules that are not so easily defined nor understood. What if her opponent is actually the man she’s been searching for? Can Ivy secure a match before her time runs out, or will surrendering her heart mean losing all that was intended for her?

A Provision for Loveis part of the ENTANGLED INHERITANCE series, a set of stand-alone regency-romance novels. Look for the complete collection of stories by these incredible authors: 

A Provision for Loveby Heather Chapman (June)

His Unexpected Heiressby Sally Britton (July)

The Rivals of Rosennor Hallby Rebecca Connolly (August)

An Unwelcome Suitorby Ashtyn Newbold (September)

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The Man in the Arena

Brene Brown is changing the way I see everything. From her ted talks to her Netflix special, Brene’s words and stories have a way of sinking to my heart. So, if you haven’t checked out her Youtube speeches or her Netflix special, you are missing out on some profound wisdom.

In a few of her speeches, she quotes Theodore Roosevelt and “the man in the arena” quote. These words are applicable to everything, yes–but as a writer, these words breathe confidence and courage to my soul.

Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

― Theodore Roosevelt

Brene Brown goes on to speak about vulnerability. Vulnerability is courage. Without being willing to be seen– for our good and bad and everything in between– we are incapable of innovation, creativity, and change (Brene!). If we are waiting to be perfect before we write our first story (or whatever it is you feel deficient at), we will never see results; we will never live a courageous life. So… with that… I will keep writing–imperfectly, yes, but with vulnerability and courage.

It’s not the critic that counts.

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